From Maternity Ward to Macarons: Local OBGYN Finds Passion for Baking

*Editor’s Note: This story was originally published on marionmacarons.com

Glenn Hunt, a local OBGYN in Oxford, discovered a new hidden talent—baking. He first discovered this new found passion while baking for his youngest granddaughter’s birthday.

Glenn Hunt discovered his passion for baking while creating sweets and treats for his youngest granddaughter’s birthday. Photo courtesy of Glenn Hunt.

Hunt’s signature creation is the macaron, specifically rosewater raspberry macarons. From his kitchen to The Farmstead on Woodson Ridge, Hunt now offers baking classes to those with a passion for sweets and treats.

Rosewater raspberry macarons, with their floral tones, capture the scent of spring to cast off the gloom of winter. Close your eyes and inhale the aroma of roses when walking through a garden in full bloom. Taste the raspberries and contemplate their short, transient fruit bearing season. The short life of a macaron from baking to the final bite. Impermanence encapsulated in a macaron.

Recently, Susan Tullos at The Farmstead on Woodson Ridge asked if Glenn Hunt would be interested in teaching a class on baking macarons. Rosewater raspberry macarons were the first flavor that Hunt baked for his youngest granddaughter’s birthday and are still a favorite for his friends and family. When he accepted the invitation to teach the macaron class, he decided to demonstrate baking this particular macaron.

First, he baked a batch of rosewater raspberry macarons at home that he then placed for each class participant to taste prior to teaching the eager students his craft.

The class was given a copy of his basic macaron recipe. Hunt then discussed the baking process and the difference between the French and Italian methods. For this recipe, he demonstrated the Italian method. Hunt tried to convey the concept of meraki—doing something with soul, creativity or love.

Participants first sampled macarons before baking them themselves. Photo courtesy of Glenn Hunt.

The almond flour and confectioners sugar was preweighed, ground, and sifted prior to the class due to time constraints.

Water and sugar were placed over high heat. As the syrup reached 110 degrees Celsius, Hunt began whisking the egg whites in a stand mixer. When the syrup reached 120 degrees Celsius, and the whites developed soft peaks, the syrup was slowly poured along the edge of the bowl. The meringue was whipped on medium speed for another five minutes, then food coloring gel and rosewater were added.

He demonstrated folding the meringue into the almond flour and confectioner sugar mixture, and then each class participant practiced folding the macaronage, until it flowed like lava and slowly melted back into itself.

The macaronage was divided into several bags, the piping technique was described, and the class piped out the macaron shells.

The ovens were preheated to 300 degrees Fahrenheit. The shells were air dried for thirty minutes. Then they were placed in the oven for 10 minutes, the door was opened slightly and then baked for an additional four minutes.

Once cooled, the shells were paired. The raspberry Italian buttercream piped in a circle along the edge of one of the macaron shells and finished with a bullseye of raspberry preserves. The shells were gently pressed together to complete the macaron.

The class was a huge success, Hunt said.

“Everyone had a good time and took their macaron creations home to enjoy,” Hunt said. “It was so much fun sharing the joy of baking.”

Hunt will offer additional baking classes on February 21 from 6 to 8 p.m. and an additional class on Sunday, April 7 with an Easter theme.

Those interested in participating in Glenn Hunt’s baking classes can sign up on The Farmstead on Woodson Ridge’s website.


Hottytoddy.com staff report

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